Jan Beetz

Jan Pieter Beetz BSc, BA, MSc, MA (Erasmus University Rotterdam), Ph.D. (Exeter)

January 2014 to May 2014

Global Justice and Transnational Democracy (POL2068)

Graduate Teaching Assistant, Department of Politics, University of Exeter (UK)

The module aims to provide an introduction to important moral issues surrounding the sphere of international politics. We will especially discuss what the demands of justice and democracy at the international level are. Within the domain of justice, we will address issues such as global poverty and inequality, climate change and environmental ethics, justice in migration, and the legitimacy of humanitarian intervention. Within the domain of democracy, central issues will include the desirability and feasibility of a global democratic government and the democratic accountability of non-state actors, such as non-governmental organizations.

18th March 2013

Globalisation and Democratic Politics: The End of the Nation State? (POL3132)

Guest Lecturer, Department of Politics, University of Exeter (UK)

The lecture took the form of a class discussion on the plausibility and desirability of the creation of democratic governance beyond the borders of the democratic nation-state. Statism was confronted with different idea(l)s of global governance and cosmopolitanism.

11th March 2013

EU Politics (PC2019)

Guest Lecturer, Department of Politics, University of Exeter (UK)

 

The lecture introduced students to the debate on the EU's legitimacy. It placed this debate within the historical context of deeper and further European integration. The lecture provided the students with an analytical overview of the literature on the EU's legitimacy. The two main analytical dimensions were the different models of the European system of governance - the regime - and the kind of justifications for European integration and its subsequent creation of European institutions - the type of people. Finally, the most prominent combinations of these dimensions - accounts of the Euro-polity‚Äč - were introduced to provide the students with an impression of the potential diversity of ideals for future of the EU. 

4th March 2013

Globalisation and Democratic Politics: The End of the Nation State? (POL3132)

Guest Lecturer, Department of Politics, University of Exeter (UK)

 

The lecture inquired into the underlying theoretical concepts in the debate on the legitimacy of the EU, as an example of post-national democracy. The concept of sovereignty was explored in relation to the concept of democratic legitimacy. Its importance to both federal and intergovernmental understandings of European integration were fleshed out. Further, the challenges for more novel ideals of governance were discussed. Different conceptualisations of the European people or peoples featured prominently in this part. Finally, normative alternatives to sovereignty and new understandings of the concept were evaluated on their plausibility and desirability

12th February 2013

Europeanization and Federalism in Europe (POLM079)

Guest Lecturer, Department of Politics, University of Exeter (UK)

'Conceptions of Legitimacy in the European Union': The lecture consisted of three interrelated parts. First, the role of concepts in political practice and academic theories was examined. The concept of governance was taken as an example to show conceptual change in historical and theoretical contexts. Moreover, its simultaneous descriptive and normative properties were outlined. Second, the lecture applied these insights to the different concepts of legitimacy in EU-studies. Institutional regime perspectives were discussed followed by a polity-orientated perspective focussing on competing notions of the people. The final part focussed on the use of concepts for dissertation research. The lecture explored applications of concept-orientated research as well as general practical issues of concepts in political science research.

January 2013 to May 2013

Politics in Europe (POL1020)

Graduate Teaching Assistant, Department of Politics, University of Exeter (UK)

The module assesses how changing patterns of governance (specifically, the rise of the regulatory state, globalisation, and Europeanisation) are affecting traditional models of governance. These themes are explored through lectures and seminars. The course focuses on the political systems of the UK, France, Germany, Scandinavian countries and Eastern Europe. The module explains how the process of European integration has transformed political systems, political institutions and public policy, as well as the limitations of Europeanization.

24th January 2012

Europeanization and Federalism in Europe (POLM079)

Guest Lecturer, Department of Politics, University of Exeter (UK)

'Conceptions of Legitimacy in the European Union': The lecture consisted of three interrelated parts. First, the role of concepts in political practice and academic theories was examined. The concept of governance was taken as an example to show conceptual change in historical and theoretical contexts. Moreover, its simultaneous descriptive and normative properties were outlined. Second, the lecture applied these insights to the different concepts of legitimacy in EU-studies. Institutional regime perspectives were discussed followed by a polity-orientated perspective focussing on competing notions of the people. The final part focussed on the use of concepts for dissertation research. The lecture explored applications of concept-orientated research as well as general practical issues of concepts in political science research.

January 2012 to April 2012

Power and Democracy (POL1019)

Graduate Teaching Assistant, Department of Politics, University of Exeter (UK)

The aim of this course is to provide first year students with an understanding of the importance of analytical perspectives in understanding the political world. The module introduces students to the nature, limitations and possible applications of different analytical perspectives, research designs and methods in politics. It does so in reference to contemporary perspectives and empirical research on the nature of the state, the dispersal of power within, and on democracy more generally.

January 2011 to April 2011

Modern Political Analysis II (POL1015B)

Graduate Teaching Assistant, Department of Politics, University of Exeter (UK)

The aim of this course is to provide first year students with an understanding of the importance of analytical perspectives in understanding the political world. The module introduces students to the nature, limitations and possible applications of different analytical perspectives, research designs and methods in politics. It does so in reference to contemporary perspectives and empirical research on the nature of the state, the dispersal of power within, and on democracy more generally.

February 2010 to March 2010

Political Philosophy and Democracy

Academic Teacher, Faculty of Public Administration, School of Social Sciences, Erasmus University Rotterdam (NL)

The aim of this course is to introduce second year undergraduate students in public administration to political philosophy. In addition, the course shows how these ideas might still influence ways to frame legitimacy. Thus, students are asked to evaluate the legitimacy of policy implementation processes and outcomes.

January 2010 to August 2010

Atelier in Public Administration

Academic Teacher, Faculty of Public Administration, School of Social Sciences, Erasmus University Rotterdam (NL)

- Atelier 2 (Bachelor 1)

   - The governmental map of the Netherlands and the EU

   - Economics: instruments and policy

   - Introduction to constitutional and administrative law

- Atelier 3 (Bachelor 1)

   - Core concepts of organization and management

   - Methods and techniques of qualitative research

The aim of Atelier courses is to introduce first year students to a broad range of subjects relevant to public administration. Further, they aim to show the interconnectedness of the different subjects through integration assignments.